High-Quality Cataract Surgery Cost in India?

How much does a Cataract surgery cost in India?

The estimated cost of cataract surgery in India ranges between USD 500 to USD 1500. However, the prices may vary depending upon the hospital location and doctor’s practice.

What is Cataract Surgery?

Cataract surgery is a procedure to remove the lens of your eye and, in most cases, replace it with an artificial lens. Normally, the lens of your eye is clear. A cataract causes the lens to become cloudy, which eventually affects your vision.


Cataract surgery is performed by an eye doctor (ophthalmologist) on an outpatient basis, which means you don’t have to stay in the hospital after the surgery. Cataract surgery is very common and is generally a safe procedure.

Cataract surgery is one of the most common and safest surgeries performed in the India. As many as 95 percent Trusted Source of people who undergo the procedure experience an improvement in the sharpness of their vision.

How much does a Cataract surgery cost in India?

Why it's done

Cataract surgery is performed to treat cataracts. Cataracts can cause blurry vision and increase the glare from lights. If a cataract makes it difficult for you to carry out your normal activities, your doctor may suggest cataract surgery

When a cataract interferes with the treatment of another eye problem, cataract surgery may be recommended. For example, doctors may recommend cataract surgery if a cataract makes it difficult for your eye doctor to examine the back of your eye to monitor or treat other eye problems, such as age-related macular degeneration or diabetic retinopathy.

In most cases, waiting to have cataract surgery won’t harm your eye, so you have time to consider your options. If your vision is still quite good, you may not need cataract surgery for many years, if ever.


Related Article- Vitreoretinal Surgery Cost in India

Symptoms of Cataract

Signs and symptoms of cataracts include:

  • Clouded, blurred or dim vision
  • Increasing difficulty with vision at night
  • Sensitivity to light and glare
  • Need for brighter light for reading and other activities
  • Seeing “halos” around lights
  • Frequent changes in eyeglass or contact lens prescription
  • Fading or yellowing of colors
  • Double vision in a single eye

At first, the cloudiness in your vision caused by a cataract may affect only a small part of the eye’s lens and you may be unaware of any vision loss. As the cataract grows larger, it clouds more of your lens and distorts the light passing through the lens. This may lead to more noticeable symptoms.

Causes

Most cataracts develop when aging or injury changes the tissue that makes up your eye’s lens.

Some inherited genetic disorders that cause other health problems can increase your risk of cataracts. Cataracts can also be caused by other eye conditions, past eye surgery or medical conditions such as diabetes. Long-term use of steroid medications, too, can cause cataracts to develop.

Types of Cataract Surgery

There are two types of cataract surgery. Your doctor can explain the differences and help determine which is better for you:

1. Phacoemulsification, or phaco. A small incision is made on the side of the cornea, the clear, dome-shaped surface that covers the front of the eye. Your doctor inserts a tiny probe into the eye. This device emits ultrasound waves that soften and break up the lens so that it can be removed by suction. Most cataract surgery today is done by phacoemulsification, also called “small incision cataract surgery.”


2. Extracapsular surgery.
Your doctor makes a longer incision on the side of the cornea and removes the cloudy core of the lens in one piece. The rest of the lens is removed by suction.

What are the different types of lenses for cataract surgery?

First, let’s review the options:

1. Monofocal lenses are designed to provide the best possible vision at one distance. Most people who choose monofocals have their IOLs set for distance vision and use reading glasses for near-vision tasks.

2. Multifocal IOLs have multiple corrective zones built into the lens (much like bifocal or trifocal eyeglasses). This allows you to see both near and far objects. In addition, some multifocals may also correct intermediate vision.

3. Extended depth-of-focus (EDOF) IOLs have only one corrective zone, but this zone is stretched to allow distance and intermediate vision.

4. Accommodative lenses can also correct vision at all distances, but the lens uses the natural movements of your eye’s muscles to change focus.

Before Cataract Surgery

A week or so before your surgery, your doctor performs a painless ultrasound test to measure the size and shape of your eye. This helps determine the right type of lens implant (intraocular lens, or IOL).


Nearly everyone who has cataract surgery will be given IOLs. These lenses improve your vision by focusing light on the back of your eye. You won’t be able to see or feel the lens. It requires no care and becomes a permanent part of your eye.


A variety of IOLs with different features are available. Before surgery, you and your eye doctor will discuss which type of IOL might work best for you and your lifestyle. Cost may also be a factor, as insurance companies may not pay for all types of lenses.


IOLs are made of plastic, acrylic or silicone. Some IOLs block ultraviolet light. Some IOLs are rigid plastic and implanted through an incision that requires several stitches (sutures) to close.


However, many IOLs are flexible, allowing a smaller incision that requires few or no stitches. The surgeon folds this type of lens and inserts it into the empty capsule where the natural lens used to be. Once inside the eye, the folded IOL unfolds, filling the empty capsule.

During the procedure

Cataract surgery, usually an outpatient procedure, takes an hour or less to perform.

First, your doctor will place eyedrops in your eye to dilate your pupil. You’ll receive local anesthetics to numb the area, and you may be given a sedative to help you relax. If you’re given a sedative, you may remain awake, but groggy, during surgery.

During cataract surgery, the clouded lens is removed, and a clear artificial lens is usually implanted. In some cases, however, a cataract may be removed without implanting an artificial lens.

During cataract surgery In India

Surgical methods used to remove cataracts include:

  • Using an ultrasound probe to break up the lens for removal. During a procedure called phacoemulsification (fak-o-e-mul-sih-fih-KAY-shun), your surgeon makes a tiny incision in the front of your eye (cornea) and inserts a needle-thin probe into the lens substance where the cataract has formed.

  • Your surgeon then uses the probe, which transmits ultrasound waves, to break up (emulsify) the cataract and suction out the fragments. The very back of your lens (the lens capsule) is left intact to serve as a place for the artificial lens to rest. Stitches may be used to close the tiny incision in your cornea at the completion of the procedure.

  • Making an incision in the eye and removing the lens in one piece. A less frequently used procedure called extracapsular cataract extraction requires a larger incision than that used for phacoemulsification. Through this larger incision your surgeon uses surgical tools to remove the front capsule of the lens and the cloudy lens comprising the cataract. The very back capsule of your lens is left in place to serve as a place for the artificial lens to rest.

  • This procedure may be performed if you have certain eye complications. With the larger incision, stitches are required.

Once the cataract has been removed by either phacoemulsification or extracapsular extraction, the artificial lens is implanted into the empty lens capsule.

After Cataract Procedure

After cataract surgery, expect your vision to begin improving within a few days. Your vision may be blurry at first as your eye heals and adjusts.

Colors may seem brighter after your surgery because you are looking through a new, clear lens. A cataract is usually yellow- or brown-tinted before surgery, muting the look of colors.

You’ll usually see your eye doctor a day or two after your surgery, the following week, and then again after about a month to monitor healing.

It’s normal to feel itching and mild discomfort for a couple of days after surgery. Avoid rubbing or pushing on your eye.

Your doctor may ask you to wear an eye patch or protective shield the day of surgery. Your doctor may also recommend wearing the eye patch for a few days after your surgery and the protective shield when you sleep during the recovery period.

Your doctor may prescribe eyedrops or other medication to prevent infection, reduce inflammation and control eye pressure. Sometimes, these medications can be injected into the eye at the time of surgery.

After a couple of days, most of the discomfort should disappear. Often, complete healing occurs within eight weeks.

During at least the first week of your recovery

  • Strenuous activity and heavy lifting (nothing over 25 pounds).

  • Bending, exercising and similar activities that might stress your eye while it is healing.

  • Water that might splash into your eye and cause infection. Keep your eye closed while showering or bathing. Also, avoid swimming or hot tubs for at least two weeks.

  • Any activity that would expose your healing eye to dust, grime or other infection-causing contaminants.

  • Your cataract surgeon may give you other instructions and recommendations for your cataract surgery recovery, depending on your specific needs and the outcome of your procedure. If you have any questions at any time after cataract surgery, call your eye doctor for advice.

  • If you need cataract surgery in both eyes, your surgeon typically will prefer that you wait one to three weeks between procedures, so your first eye has healed sufficiently and you have good vision in that eye before the second surgery is performed.

Eyeglasses After Cataract Surgery

Unless you choose presbyopia-correcting IOLs, it’s likely you will need reading glasses after cataract surgery to see near objects clearly. Even people who choose these premium IOLs often find reading glasses are helpful for certain near tasks and seeing very small print.


In the event you have some mild refractive errors present after surgery (this is common), you may want to wear eyeglasses with progressive lenses full-time after your surgery to attain the best possible vision at all distances.


Even people who have an excellent visual outcome and can see well without glasses after cataract surgery often choose to wear eyeglasses full-time after their procedure to protect their eyes and because they feel more like themselves wearing eyeglasses after surgery if they have worn glasses most of their life.


If you choose to wear glasses after cataract surgery, lenses with anti-reflective coating and photochromic lenses are highly recommended for the best vision, comfort and appearance. Ask your eye care professional for details and to demonstrate these lenses.

Most Important Frequently Cataract Surgery

Q. Which lens is better for cataract surgery in India?

A. A monofocal lens is the most common type of lens used in cataract surgery, according to AAO. This type of lens is designed to give you crisp, clear vision at one particular distance.

 

 

Q. How painful is cataract surgery?

A. Cataract surgery is not at all painful. Most patients describe a mild sensation of pressure around the eye. In some cases, we may use local anaesthesia (administered via eye drops) or perform a small anaesthetic block around the eye

 

Q. How long does it take to recover from cataract surgery?

A. Your doctor may prescribe eyedrops or other medication to prevent infection, reduce inflammation and control eye pressure. Sometimes, these medications can be injected into the eye at the time of surgery. After a couple of days, most of the discomfort should disappear. Often, complete healing occurs within eight weeks.

 

A. What should I avoid after cataract surgery?

A. Here are 7 things that you shouldn’t do after cataract surgery:

  1. Drive. You shouldn’t drive at least 24 hours after cataract surgery.
  2. Wear Makeup. Makeup is full of bacteria.
  3. Perform Any Strenuous Activity.
  4. Go Near Dusty Areas.
  5. Swim.
  6. Forget To Wear Sunglasses Outside.
  7. Rub Your Eye

 

Q. Will I still need glasses after cataract surgery?

A. Some patients do not need glasses after surgery, but most patients require glasses in the form of progressive lenses or bifocals, reading or distance glasses. Some patients may need to wear contacts, and others may not need glasses. Each patient’s needs will be determined in the post-operative period.

Best Cataract Surgery Hospitals in India

Table of Contents